Tag Archives: vitamin C

Myths about the Common Cold

Let’s examine some of the current advice about colds.

1. Wash hands and everything in sight—frequently.  I am sure this myth will die hard because we literally have been turned into germophobes by well-meaning health advisers.  The best thing about this one is that you can’t go wrong, unless you suffer from chapped hands or get reprimanded for hogging the soap and facilities. But the fact is that this is not a necessary ritual for avoiding colds.

Will the beneficial bacteria please step forward?

Will the beneficial bacteria please step forward?

2.  Take medicine—antihistamines, decongestants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and then the inevitable antibiotics if nothing else works.  But too many medications cause liver damage and can make us feel worse, not better.  To my knowledge, none of them have ever cured a cold.  The side effects of antihistamines include dry mouth, nausea, drowsiness, difficult urination and even blurred vision.  The adverse effects of NSAIDs can include gastrointestinal problems. Antibiotics are creating super bugs, not to mention killing off the beneficial bacteria that support 70% or more of our immune system. We would be better served by concentrating on probiotics and fermented vegetables.

3. Vitamins cannot prevent colds. This is certainly true if you follow the government guidelines of  90 mg of vitamin C per day for a grown man. The average 150 pound animal which makes its own vitamin C, however, produces an average of 4,000 mg per day when well–and many times more than that if needed.  Vitamin D3 presents a similar scenario, with small amounts being recommended by authorities.  But taking 5,000 IU per day (one small softgel) can boost our immunity substantially.  Getting adequate sunshine exposure is an alternative which should be considered, because almost everything we were taught about vitamin D in the past has been proven wrong. Vitamin D3 is now recognized as being the most common deficiency worldwide. See my Resources page for more information.

4. Treat colds with various hot drinks like a hot toddy, tea with lemon and honey, lemon juice with honey and cayenne, chicken broth, bone broth, etc.  There are many healthy choices, some of which may be soothing or even boost immunity, but you won’t need any of these to stop a sore throat or congestion if you prevent them from developing in the first place. The same applies to breathing steam with a towel over your head or taking a hot shower just to breathe the vapor.

5. There is no cure for the common cold.  This one is a little tricky, because it is true. But on the other hand, no cure is needed!

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Antioxidants and Cancer

Quote for the day:

It is time for conventional medicine to come to terms with their failure in cancer research and embrace selective orthomolecular methods. The public should stick with nutritional therapies while we wait, perhaps for some time, for medicine to focus on patients rather than profits. Don’t be warned off the very substances that can most help you.

My book, How to Stop Colds, Allergies & More, only covers colds, allergies and a few other conditions which can be stopped by simple hygiene measures. Obviously, cancer is way out of my league. But I have relied heavily on orthomolecular.org in my personal research and I have every reason to trust them on this one.

Don’t let the “O” word scare you. It refers to nutritional medicine.

In my opinion, Americans have been overly cautioned against taking natural supplements even though our food supply is sadly lacking in basic nutrition. Please take a look at this article and any others that may be of interest.

Antioxidants Prevent Cancer and Some May Even Cure It

Commentary by Steve Hickey, PhD
(OMNS Jan 24, 2013)

Bacteria Are Us–Part 2

After discovering the importance of microbes to our health and our very existence, we had to take a fresh look at the subject of fermenting vegetables. Gut flora is responsible for immunity and absorption of nutrients, and up to 90% of our immune defense is in our intestines.

Our ancestors used fermentation for preserving foods, long before canned goods appeared in the supermarket. The first thing I discovered is that canned sauerkraut is not the real thing. Food subjected to extreme heat in the canning process is dead and cannot possibly possess the attributes that are afforded by natural fermentation.

Our first exposure to real sauerkraut was by purchasing a refrigerated glass jar from a health food store. It had a crunchy fresh taste, but was almost as sour as the canned type. The only ingredients were cabbage, water and salt, so I assume the lactic acid created the tartness. It should be used unheated, to protect the beneficial bacteria and vitamin C. The big surprise was the cost—over $5.00 for a 25 oz. jar.

We were advised to start out with very small servings of real sauerkraut each day. The beneficial microbes in large amounts could possibly cause a die-off of pathogenic bacteria, virus and fungi, releasing toxins which could cause temporary tiredness, rashes or headaches. We had no problems with it and quickly got accustomed to the taste.

The role of beneficial microbes:

• Rid the body of toxins, including heavy metals
• Enable the gut to produce more serotonin than the brain, benefiting mood
• Improve bowel function
• Increase immunity to illnesses and environmental allergies
• Decrease plaque formation on teeth
• Improve appearance of hair and skin
• Restore the balance of the body if antibiotics must be used

If you would like to learn more about the importance of gut flora, here is an informative 25-minute video by Health Coach Summer Bock: Creating a Thriving Intestinal Ecology.

Also, here is an informative article by Dr. Joseph Mercola: How to Easily and Inexpensively Ferment your own Vegetables.

Part 3 will be about our first experiment with making sauerkraut.

Looks Like an Apple, Tastes Like an Apple?

I received this photo today from my friend, Jerica:

“So I peeled this apple at lunch today but didn’t eat it. I peeled it because it was conventional and I didn’t want to eat the petroleum wax coating. I forgot about the second half, which sat on the counter all day until 8:00 this evening. When I picked it up, I was quite surprised to find that, except in a few bruised places, it had NOT TURNED BROWN AT ALL. And they say irradiated food is ok to eat? It’s totally dead and without enzymes!”

This brought back memories of childhood, when I had negative feelings about a fruit than tended to turn brown before you finished eating it. I thought it was trying to rot before my eyes. Only now do I appreciate the science behind it and the importance of raw foods for the nourishment of our bodies. I always peeled apples, despite being told that the skins contained a large percentage of the nutrients. But now we are told that apples may have as many as 27 different pesticides and other chemicals, many of which are systemic and cannot be peeled off.

Apples are one of the super foods in the American diet. They are filled with antioxidants and have a reputation for fighting asthma, cancer, heart disease and type II diabetes. On the other hand, they also compete for top position on recent lists of the dirty dozen fruits and vegetables–along with peaches, celery and strawberries–because of the toxic chemicals used to grow conventional produce.

Can it still be true that an apple a day keeps the doctor away? In my opinion it is possible only if you can find a source of fresh, organic apples. I can’t imagine that members of the dirty dozen would boost immunity to the common cold, allergies or any of the usual maladies that cause most of our visits to the family doctor.

Thank goodness we can rely on plain vitamin C powder to supplement our diet rather than relying solely on fresh fruits and vegetables to get enough vitamin C.

Since we live in the South, our apples are shipped in, and we are usually limited to enjoying them in season, which is best for health anyway. Fuji and Red Delicious apples are reported to have the highest phenolic and flavonoid content. We used to get some beauties from our local discount club, but not any more. I suspect there is a growing demand for organic produce as more people learn the advantages of it.