Tag Archives: allergies

How to Stop a Cold: The Nip-it Trick

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The flowers are extra, of course, but you might be able to enjoy them again if you have respiratory allergies.

The secret to never having another cold is to do this simple procedure as soon as you notice the first symptom.

You can be prepared by putting together a little “nip-it kit” in advance. No medications are needed. You will only need the following supplies:

One 3 oz. bottle
One fluid ounce of vodka (80 proof=40% alcohol)
Two ounces of filtered or distilled water
One plastic snack or sandwich bag
A dozen or so short cotton swabs

Fill the little bottle with the two liquids and put it in the plastic bag with a supply of Q-tips or other brand of swabs. This can be stored in a medicine cabinet, make-up drawer, glove box, purse, desk, gym bag or anywhere handy when needed.

Your first symptom of a cold might be sneezing, repeatedly clearing your throat or the sudden onset of sniffles. Take action immediately. Moisten a swab, gently run it up one nostril and sniff to coat the upper nostril and possibly get a hint of it in the back of the throat. There will not be enough liquid to allow inhaling it into the lungs. Then treat the other nostril.  Within minutes the symptoms will disappear.

Why not make extra kits for family and friends? You could mix a half-pint (one cup) of vodka with two cups of water and fill eight bottles. You could get creative and add a small drop of peppermint oil to the larger recipe to add a little scent and flavor.

Never substitute rubbing alcohol because it is made from propane.

A child-proof cap should be used, of course, if you have children.

The Nip-it Trick is also effective if you have respiratory allergies due to smoke, pollens or scents.  It can stop the reaction before you get congestion or a headache.

Enjoy!

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The Truth is in the Details–Stop Colds with Diluted Alcohol

You can stop a common cold as soon as you notice the first symptom.  This is the ultimate do-it-yourself project, because no one else can do it for you.  But first you must learn the details of how to do it, watch for minor symptoms, and be ready to take action as needed.

I am not a doctor or a scientist, so I can only tell you what works for me.  I rely on Google for background facts and invite you to do your own research if you want more supplemental information.  Since the method really does work for me, I would be remiss if I did not share this knowledge.

There is not a vaccine which can kill all 200 or more viruses which are at fault in causing what we call the common cold.  That is probably a good thing, because we have been inadvertently killing too many friendly microbes already, which causes other problems for our health.  There is no medication which can cure a cold either.  Medications attack symptoms not causes, and they can affect the whole body in negative ways.

Can drinking alcohol cure a cold?  No.  You cannot have enough alcohol in your bloodstream to kill a cold, without being dead.  That would sort of defeat the purpose, wouldn’t it?  Since colds do not live in the bloodstream, we can rule out any need to increase our blood alcohol level.

There have been some studies, however, which showed that moderate consumption of alcohol might reduce the incidence of colds.  A 1993 study at Carnegie Mellon found that moderate drinking reduced the frequency of colds, except for smokers, and a 2002 study in Spain found that red wine might be helpful, but other studies found no benefit.  There has been some speculation that perhaps the antioxidants in red wine might be more effective than the alcohol.  On the other hand, there is some evidence that alcohol aids the absorption of resveratrol.   But I think the positive results found in the two studies might have resulted from occasional coating of the throat with mild alcohol coincidentally at times when colds were just getting started.

Only ethyl alcohol (ethanol as in vodka and other alcoholic beverages) is safe for drinking.  I do not recommend drinking, but that is just my opinion.  Isopropyl alcohol, the rubbing alcohol which is used as a disinfectant, and methyl alcohol, which is used in antifreeze, should never be consumed.

Oddly enough, 70% ethanol is more effective at killing bacteria than 100% ethanol.  This has something to do with alcohol evaporating at room temperature and the higher concentration may evaporate too quickly to be effective.  That may also explain why rubbing alcohols are diluted to 70%.

The bacteria responsible for tetanus and botulism are said to be resistant to ethanol, while strep bacteria on a thermometer might be killed in as little as twenty seconds. But we have a lot to learn. Microbiologists say there are thousands of species of microbes which live in and on the human body, each with its own role in the overall scheme of things. Microbes are critical to our existence, so we must learn to get along.

Although bacteria and fungi can cause respiratory infections, the common cold is caused by viruses.  They are said to do little or no actual tissue damage.  The symptoms we experience result from an excessive response by our immune system.  Without knowing how to put a stop to colds, we have been fighting the symptoms with medications that affect the whole body.  Then our immune system may be weakened, allowing secondary infections like sinusitis or even pneumonia.

Alcohol cannot kill viruses because viruses are not alive—but it can inactivate them, some more easily than others.  Viruses can also be inactivated with bleach, acids and heat.

Some viruses such as polio can infect the gut because they are able to withstand acid and higher body temperature.  Cold-causing viruses live in the respiratory system where more moderate conditions exist. They thrive in thickened mucus, without which they cannot do their dirty deeds.  This is a big clue–get rid of congestion, and let your body’s natural secretions wash away the unfriendly microbes.

Viruses on skin or other surfaces can also be inactivated with alcohol, but those which stay inside nerves are believed not to expose themselves to this possibility.  I believe I discovered an exception to this, however, when I devised my remedy for stopping cold sores before they break out.

It is generally agreed that consumption of alcohol has a dehydrating effect on the body, which might make it more difficult to avoid colds or other respiratory infections.  However, I have found that topical applications of diluted alcohol do not seem to have a dehydrating effect on the mucus membranes of the throat, but serve more as a cleaning and wetting agent.

So let’s consider one of the first symptoms of a beginning cold–a sore throat. You can put a stop to it quickly by gargling with a mouthwash containing 14% alcohol.  Since mouthwashes contain other ingredients for fighting dental problems, along with artificial colors and flavors, and they even recommend calling a poison control center in the event you should swallow any, you might want to mix your own gargling solution.  Since the only active ingredient needed for stopping a sore throat is 14% ethyl alcohol, you can mix one part of 80-proof vodka with two parts of filtered water and you are good to go.

If you don’t like to gargle, you can use a little cotton swab and treat just the spots that are sore, while trying not to gag.  In this case you might want to store some diluted alcohol in a 3 oz. bottle for convenience. Or you can take the wimpy way out and use a little spray bottle to apply it.  The goal is not to sterilize your throat, but to inactivate the harmful viruses just enough to let your body stay in control.

This simple procedure has stopped every threatening sore throat for me since 2004.  I don’t know if the diluted alcohol simply inactivates enough viruses to stop their progress or if it is stopping the body’s histamine reaction, or both.  But for whatever reason, it has been 100% effective.

Although this is a reliable method for stopping a sore throat, the cold virus may decide to move into your nose, sinuses, ears,  or lungs anyway.  My book describes simple methods for quickly taking care of each of those contingencies.

Every time I am able to stop a cold before it gets started, I remember how I used to think that colds were inevitable, along with the required tissues, medications, secondary infections, expense, sick days and misery. I am also blessed to be free of headaches and allergies which I had since childhood.

Did someone say, “This is nothing new.  We have gargled with mouthwash to treat a sore throat for years—but it doesn’t work?”  As the old expression goes—the devil is in the details.  As a child, when being treated for a cold, the doctor would swab my sore throat with something.  I don’t know what it was, but it was brown, strong and nasty; and it seemed to help.  Then I got a chest cold or bronchitis or whatever anyway and would get a penicillin shot to help clear it up. As a teenager I was occasionally able to ward off a sore throat by swabbing it with strong mouthwash, but usually the congestion would settle in my head or lungs anyway. I had no confidence in the use of mouthwash.

The detail that is different here is that the first symptom of a cold must be treated immediately.  There is no time to get a doctor’s appointment or look for supplies after work. You can’t let bad guys move into your home and worry about how to get rid of them next week.

I never wash my hands unless they are dirty, but I don’t allow congestion to set in. I suspect that even if I did, I could probably stop a full-blown cold by using every tip in my book.  But it is so easy to stop the first sniffling, sneezing, coughing, sinus drip, earache, or raw feeling in the head or chest that I don’t want to let it develop into something worse.

I don’t think a drop of diluted alcohol on a swab is particularly dangerous, but I have no way of knowing if you are allergic to alcohol or if a cotton swab could be contaminated in some way. You are responsible for your own health and I expect you to use your own judgment.

Some people are successful in stopping colds by putting 3% hydrogen peroxide in each ear, or by using a neti pot for nasal irrigation.  I don’t enjoy nasal irrigation, so  I would only use that as a last resort.

I think we have the potential to stop allowing the common cold to be the reason for up to 40% of all doctor appointments.  We can free doctors to do more of the important work for which they were trained.

Looks Like an Apple, Tastes Like an Apple?

I received this photo today from my friend, Jerica:

“So I peeled this apple at lunch today but didn’t eat it. I peeled it because it was conventional and I didn’t want to eat the petroleum wax coating. I forgot about the second half, which sat on the counter all day until 8:00 this evening. When I picked it up, I was quite surprised to find that, except in a few bruised places, it had NOT TURNED BROWN AT ALL. And they say irradiated food is ok to eat? It’s totally dead and without enzymes!”

This brought back memories of childhood, when I had negative feelings about a fruit than tended to turn brown before you finished eating it. I thought it was trying to rot before my eyes. Only now do I appreciate the science behind it and the importance of raw foods for the nourishment of our bodies. I always peeled apples, despite being told that the skins contained a large percentage of the nutrients. But now we are told that apples may have as many as 27 different pesticides and other chemicals, many of which are systemic and cannot be peeled off.

Apples are one of the super foods in the American diet. They are filled with antioxidants and have a reputation for fighting asthma, cancer, heart disease and type II diabetes. On the other hand, they also compete for top position on recent lists of the dirty dozen fruits and vegetables–along with peaches, celery and strawberries–because of the toxic chemicals used to grow conventional produce.

Can it still be true that an apple a day keeps the doctor away? In my opinion it is possible only if you can find a source of fresh, organic apples. I can’t imagine that members of the dirty dozen would boost immunity to the common cold, allergies or any of the usual maladies that cause most of our visits to the family doctor.

Thank goodness we can rely on plain vitamin C powder to supplement our diet rather than relying solely on fresh fruits and vegetables to get enough vitamin C.

Since we live in the South, our apples are shipped in, and we are usually limited to enjoying them in season, which is best for health anyway. Fuji and Red Delicious apples are reported to have the highest phenolic and flavonoid content. We used to get some beauties from our local discount club, but not any more. I suspect there is a growing demand for organic produce as more people learn the advantages of it.

A new way to think about respiratory allergies

My expertise on the subject of allergies comes from over fifty years of putting up with reactions to smoke of all kinds, dust, perfume (no matter how expensive), musty paper (no matter how interesting) and many pollens which shall remain unidentified.  I experienced headaches, nausea, congestion, sinusitis, chronic cough, sneezing, earache, various secondary infections, and feeling under the weather for a good chunk of my life.

I tried various over-the-counter and prescription medications, to no avail. They are more likely to cause liver damage than to cure an allergy.  Why use a whole-body treatment for a very small, localized problem?

Secondary infections would usually result in the use of antibiotics, which are now known to affect the balance of thousands of species of microbes which inhabit our bodies–more of which are beneficial than bad.

The remaining professional advice was usually about avoiding the irritants—never mind that pollens can travel hundreds of miles and exposure to most of the other culprits was often beyond my control.

Now I know it was all for no good reason.  No one is really allergic to any of those substances!  Some human bodies just think they are. How unfortunate.

One day in November of 2004, I read an article written by a chemist, explaining how to avoid the common cold.  He said his very inexpensive method would stop the histamine reaction caused by cold viruses.  Just stopping the reaction and preventing congestion would make the cold go away.  It turned out that his technique is also effective against the excessive histamine reactions of the body caused by false alarms about harmless irritants.

The rest is history.  I can honestly say I have not had a cold, a headache or any repercussions from allergies since that time.  If I notice that my nose doesn’t like something, I can help it relax and go about its ordinary business.  No more fake allergic reactions are permitted.

Yes, I know.  If something sounds too good to be true, it probably is–or is that an old wives tale in this instance?

I have no experience with food intolerance, extreme reactions to insect stings or contact allergies that can cause severe inflammatory responses. But if you share fake allergies to substances which are not really harmful, I recommend that you investigate this further.

What do we know for sure that just ain’t so?

Mark Twain once said, “It ain’t what you don’t know that gets you into trouble. It’s what you know for sure that just ain’t so.” I have noticed more and more examples of the latter lately–especially in the areas of health and wellness.

Like many young mothers, I became more interested in the subject of nutrition when our children were babies. As a result, they did not have frequent colds and allergies like most of their classmates.

I remember when one of our sons came home from school complaining that something was wrong with his nose. I was checking to see if he had gotten bruised or something when he explained that he couldn’t breathe out of one side. I started laughing before I realized his feelings were hurt by my insensitive reaction to the fact that he didn’t even know what a cold was. This was followed by time out for some extra TLC and vitamin C.

The Adele Davis books were my favorite references during those years and the benefits of her advice were obvious, not only for the children but also for the parents, although we didn’t follow her recommendations as closely for ourselves.

After her death, I noticed that at least one of her books was revised by someone who had bought into the new assumptions about the dangers of cholesterol. It turned out, however, that she was right all along–cholesterol is not the culprit in heart disease. See my Resource page at www.howtostopcolds.com for reference to the book by Dr. Tom Levy, showing that our deficiency of vitamin C is actually at fault.

The books by Adele Davis are rather outdated now, but I still use them as a backup reference because some things do not change. No one can know everything, and many scientific advances have been made since her death.

Unfortunately, Adele Davis was discredited by some and labeled a quack. It is discouraging to see the same kind of things happening today to some of our pioneers in nutrition and wellness.